Despite the ongoing increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases, the global mean surface temperature (GMST) has remained rather steady and has even decreased.


Although it is obvious from data that there has been a 20 year plateau in global warming even as atmospheric CO2 keeps rising; the denying alarmists keep trying to hide the hiatus.

Here are a few denying reports:


From Scientific American (Jan 17)No Pause in Ocean Warming
Various studies have debunked the idea of a pause, or hiatus, in global warming—the contention that global surface temperatures stopped rising during the first decade of this century.

 From Inside Climate News (May 17):



Global Warming 'Hiatus' Is Debunked Again by Researchers

For years, the idea of a hiatus, or a "pause" in global warming between 1998 and 2012, was used by climate change skeptics as evidence that the earth wasn't actually getting that much hotter. This was despite a significant body of science showing that the data underpinning the doubters' argument was flawed and that it was unlikely that any meaningful hiatus had occurred.
Inside Climate News cited a paper in Nature.com:

Reconciling controversies about the 'global warming hiatus'



Reconciling controversies about the
‘global warming hiatus’
Iselin Medhaug
1
, Martin B. Stolpe
1
, Erich M. Fischer
1
& Reto Knutti
Reconciling controversies about the
‘global warming hiatus’
Iselin Medhaug
1
, Martin B. Stolpe
1
, Erich M. Fischer
1
& Reto Knutt
Deny away, Alarmists. However, as pointed out before on this blog, some scientists admit the global warming hiatus and write papers about it.

Below are two of such papers.

Climate model simulations of the observed early-2000s hiatus of global warming
  • Meehl et al: Nature Climate Change volume4pages898902 (2014) doi:10.1038/nclimate2357

Abstract

  • The slowdown in the rate of global warming in the early 2000s is not evident in the multi-model ensemble average of traditional climate change projection simulations1. However, a number of individual ensemble members from that set of models successfully simulate the early-2000s hiatus when naturally-occurring climate variability involving the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) coincided, by chance, with the observed negative phase of the IPO that contributed to the early-2000s hiatus. If the recent methodology of initialized decadal climate prediction could have been applied in the mid-1990s using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 multi-models, both the negative phase of the IPO in the early 2000s as well as the hiatus could have been simulated, with the multi-model average performing better than most of the individual models. The loss of predictive skill for six initial years before the mid-1990s points to the need for consistent hindcast skill to establish reliability of an operational decadal climate prediction system.
    And the second:

Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature
Zhou & Wang: 
Scientific Reports 6, Article #31789 (2016) doi:10.1038/srep31789|

Introduction

Land surface air temperature (Ta) is one of the fundamental variables in weather and climatic observations, modeling, and applications1,2Despite the ongoing increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases, the global mean surface temperature (GMST) has remained rather steady and has even decreased in the central and eastern Pacific since 1998.  (My emphasis)
So, notwithstanding the attempts by denying alarmists,  some scientists say that  despite the ongoing increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases, the global mean surface temperature (GMST) has remained rather steady and has even decreased.
  • volume

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